2012 And Before News

  • How Native Insects Could Reduce Pesticide Use in Northwest Vineyards Nov. 25, 2011 | Northwest Public Radio PROSSER, Wash. – For every crop, there are good-guy bugs and bad-guy bugs. Take Washington’s prized crop of wine grapes. Now, consider the anagrus wasp and the leafhopper. Going by their names, the wasp sounds like the scarier insect, right? But the grape leafhopper can actually do a…
  • Unique New Book December 1, 2011  Nella Letizia l WSU News WSU Entomologist David James, Coauthors New Book on Life Histories of Pacific Northwest Butterflies PROSSER, Wash.—The California Sister has “fangs” as a caterpillar that it bares when disturbed. In its juvenile form, it also builds piers from its own dung on the leaves it feeds on to…
  • Sustainable Farming, Insect Biodiversity and Climate Change Friday, Nov. 18, 2011 By Nella Letizia, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences PULLMAN, Wash. – Researchers at Washington State University are conducting a study with potato farmers to determine if promoting biodiversity in insect communities helps insects, especially beneficial ones, withstand the effects of a warming climate. "There really isn’t much research…
  • The Model Makers CAHNRS Connections 2011, by Brian Clark Vince Jones is striving to push forward the frontiers of our understanding of the complex ecology at play among insects in fruit tree orchards. Part engineering, part biochemistry, and part psychology, the technolo- gies Jones and his colleagues have developed measure and channel bug behavior. Using lures and attractants,…
  • Crop Damage Prevention New tree fruit pest meets its match CAHNRS, Monday, Aug. 8, 2011 WENATCHEE, Wash. - In the course of a single year, a tiny insect has been damaging tree fruit around the globe. Spotted wing drosophila, or SWD, a type of vinegar or fruit fly, has been known in Japan, its home turf, for decades.…
  • Research Sheds New Light on Bee Health CAHNRS Connections Magazine 2011, by Kacie McPartland, MNEC intern New research conducted at WSU is the first to demonstrate the sub-lethal effects of pesticide residue exposure on an insect largely responsible for a third of the human diet. Judy Wu, a former entomology graduate student at WSU and current Ph.D. student at the University of…
  • Business is Blooming June 2011 Washington State Magazine, by Hannelore Sudermann | © Washington State University On a sunny weekend in early spring, 40 farmers and would-be cut flower growers fill the second floor of the barn at Jello Mold Farm in the Skagit Valley. Bundled in their coats against the cool morning, they eagerly listen to more…
  • Living the Right-Sized Life January 2012, Washington State Magazine, by Eric Sorensen | © Washington State University I want to walk on water, climb walls, and dance on the ceiling. If insects can do it, it’s only fair that I should, too. But this thing called physics has decreed otherwise. Carol Anelli, a WSU entomologist, can tell you why,…
  • Industrial Chemicals Benefiting Public Health, Food Supply January 18, 2012, OnPoint Do the benefits of pesticide use outweigh the health risks? During today's OnPoint, Allan Felsot, a professor of environmental toxicology at Washington State University, explains why he believes that despite the controversy surrounding pesticides, they play a crucial role in protecting food supply and public health. He also weighs in on…
  • New Buzz on Colony Collapse Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012, by Linda Weiford, WSU News Scientists investigate beekeeper's discovery PULLMAN, Wash. - For longtime commercial beekeeper Eric Olson of Yakima, no sting is as painful as the one he felt last winter when he discovered his hives had gone silent. Peering into each box, he saw the queen and a mere…
  • Addressing Honey Bee Demise Feb. 8, 2012, WSU News Advisor Helps Alternative Bee Business Take Flight EVERETT, Wash. - Anyone who has been paying attention knows the honey bee population is in decline, and the loss of the bees’ pollination role could spell disaster for the food supply. While scientists search for the cause of the colony collapse disorder…
  • Orchard Menace February 15, 2012, On Solid Ground WSU Scientists Use Flower Power to Combat Orchard Menace Apple orchards are intricate webs involving a delicate balance between trees, soils, water, insects, and more. To manage the pests that can potentially damage a crop of apples, growers often apply pesticides. There are several problems associated with pesticide use, though,…
  • Endangered species Wednesday, Mar. 7, 2012 WSU News Commonly used herbicides seen as threat to butterflies PUYALLUP, Wash. - A Washington State University toxicologist has found that three commonly used herbicides can dramatically reduce butterfly populations. The research was aimed at possible effects on the Lange’s metalmark, an endangered species in northern California. But it has implications…
  • Flight of the Alkali Bee May 3, 2012, Nella Letizia, CAHNRS - Marketing, News, and Educational Communications New Study to Follow Insect’s Population, Flight Path over U.S. Highway 12 PROSSER, Wash.—Can a bee learn to fly over, instead of across, a busy highway? WSU entomologist Douglas Walsh is working with the Washington State Department of Transportation to find out. Walsh…
  • Raising Queens Spring 2012 by Hannelore Sudermann | Washington State Magazine Few things are as mysterious and amazing as the life of the queen bee, says bee breeder Sue Cobey. Just a few days after she hatches from her cell, the queen’s fertility is optimal and she has just a brief time to mate for the rest…
  • Arthropods: Insects that Live on Humans WSU News, May 24  PULLMAN, Washington Imagine sitting down to a brown-bag lunch discussion and being handed a ponytailed head infested with lice eggs. The head is carved of wood, mind you, but the hair and eggs are very much real. Such was the scene at a recent lunch presentation by Washington State University entomologist…
  • State Prisoners Give Monarch Project Wings July 2, 2012 by Nella Letizia, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences | WSU News WALLA WALLA, Wash. - Gilbert London stands in front of a blue plastic food storage barrel converted into a Monarch butterfly rearing cage. Inside, roughly two dozen opaque-green chrysalises hang from milkweed plants like living jewels. In roughly 10…
  • Insulin Signal Sensitivity WSU News,  July 26, 2012 Pullman, WA PULLMAN, Wash. – In the animal kingdom, huge weapons such as elk antlers or ornaments like peacock feathers are sexy. Their extreme size attracts potential mates and warns away lesser rivals. Now researchers led by scientists at the University of Montana and Washington State University have discovered a…
  • Life Histories – The Butterflies of Cascadia Fall 2012 | Washington State Magazine | by Tim Steury James, a research entomologist at the Irrigated Tree Fruit Research Center in Prosser, has with coauthor David Nunnallee published Life Histories of Cascadia Butterflies (Oregon State University Press, 2011). It’s a unique and exhaustive documentary of the life cycles, from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis…
  • Alkali Bee August 6, 2012, Seattle Times, by Lynda V. Mapes Farmers worry that road project will turn productive bees into roadkill The world's largest managed population of native pollinators in Walla Walla County is in the path of a state road-construction project. TOUCHET, Walla Walla County — For decades, Mike Buckley has farmed his family place…
  • Automated Insect Traps Aim to Simplify Pest Detection September 2012, On Solid Ground, by Bob Hoffman Insect traps can be an orchardist’s best friend, giving early notice of emerging threats to fruit. But they can also be a management headache. That is why Vince Jones, a scientist at the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee, is cooperating with experts in…
  • Insect Flight Mill Research Returns Valuable Information M.S. student, Teah Smith watches a moth do laps on a flight mill. Photo by Bob Hoffmann/WSU MNEC. Researchers at the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee have resurrected an old technology, the flight mill, to put moths through their paces and see what moths in action are made of. Insect flight…