William J. Turner

William J. Turner   Areas of Interest Insect taxonomy and systematics. Taxonomy of economically-important Diptera. Biosystematics, biology and evolution of Diptera. Swarming, courtship and mating in Diptera. Interactive multimedia computer systems for teaching. Education B.A. in Education, University of California, Berkeley 1963 M.S. in Entomology, University of California, Berkeley 1966 Ph.D. in Entomology, University of… » More ...

Gary L. Piper

Gary L. Piper Specialization and Areas of Interest I teach various integrated pest management (IPM 201, 399, 452/552 and 462/562) and entomology (ENTOM 350) courses to undergraduate and graduate students. I advise students pursuing the Agriculture and Food Security major in the Agricultural and Food Systems B.S. degree program and also am an academic advisor… » More ...

John J. Brown

John J. Brown Specialization and Areas of Particular Interest Insect physiologist interested in host/parasite interactions and rearing of lepidopteran hosts and their parasites, and diapause physiology. Toxicologist interested in insect growth regulators that selectively kill target pests without harming beneficial arthropods, especially in aquatic systems. Education B.S. in Forestry, University of Missouri 1971 Ph.D. in… » More ...

Jeb P. Owen

  Jeb P. Owen Assistant Professor Areas of Interest Interactions between parasitic arthropods and vertebrate hosts. In particular, the mechanisms of host location and selection by parasites and the role of host immune responses in shaping the population dynamics of parasites. These interests are focused on identifying critical factors in the transmission of pathogens by… » More ...

Carol M. Anelli

Professor Areas of Interest Current areas focus on the history of entomology and evolutionary thought, teaching of evolution, scientific literacy, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.  Other research areas include insect physiology and assessment of student learning. Education B.A. Biology, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT (1975) M.S. Entomology, University of Illinois at… » More ...

Exploring Impact of Pesticides on Bee Colonies

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The sudden disappearance of honey bees in many parts of the country might be related to pesticide exposure, according to Washington State University entomologist Walter S. Sheppard. Read article, The Secret Death of Bees, from Spring 2010 in the Washington State Magazine Beekeepers have struggled as hives have failed soon after the bees embark on their… » More ...